The Well of Forgiveness Spell

The Well of Forgiveness Spell

 

You need:

red ink Piece of paper small jar vinegar

To enable you to forgive someone who has wronged you write their name nine times with red ink on the piece of paper. Place the paper into the jar and cover it with the vinegar. Secure the lid on the jar. Bury the jar away from your home.

Advertisements

Bath #2 for Clearing Away All Psychic Nastiness: The Vinegar Bath

General Instructions for all Baths

Once the bath is ready, sit in the tub, and completely immerse yourself seven times, allowing the mixture to flow into all body openings. (Swish it around in your mouth as well, but do not swallow it.) Stay in the tub for seven minutes, then get out, allowing the moisture on your body and hair to dry naturally.

The Vinegar Bath

Long known for its healing and curative properties, vinegar also has the capacity to slice through psychic grime, making it perfect for this bath.

Materials needed:

1   c. apple cider vinegar

1   T. salt

Add the ingredients to a warm tub of water, then stir clockwise with your index finger until well mixed.

Four Thieves Vinegar

Four Thieves Vinegar

Four Thieves Vinegar is used as a hexing agent. The name of the person you wish to curse is written on a piece of paper. The paper is soaked in Four Thieves Vinegar. The paper is allowed to dry and then is burned. It is the ashes of this paper you use in your ritual. Four Thieves Vinegar can be sprinkled on an enemy’s door step to break up their home.

To a gallon of strong cider vinegar add a handful of the following: rosemary, wormwood, lavender, rue, sage and mint. Add 1 ounce of powdered camphor gum. Tightly close the container with the cider  vinegar and herbs in it. Place this container in a pan of water and heat until the water begins to boil. Always shake this mixture before heating. Heat daily for four days. Strain the herbs from the liquid, bottle and keep tightly closed.

Obtain Money Gris Gris Bag

Obtain Money Gris Gris Bag

 

Red flannel or chamois bag

2 coins (preferably quarters)

A small pair of lodestones

A Buckeye

1 tbsp. Five Finger’s Grass

1 tbsp. Money Drawing Powder

1 tsp. Silver Weed

You will also need Shower of Gold incense to burn while you prepare the bag. Then Money Drawing Oil to anoint the bag.

Yellow Dock Ointment

Yellow Dock Ointment

 
This ointment is great for annoying skin problems your pet may pick up such as ringworm on cats or mange type diseases in dogs. It will work on you too, for any sort of itchy or rashy things. To make this recipe, you need flowers of sulfur, available at the pharmacy, a small jar of vaseline, a bottle of apple cider vinegar and the roots. You will need to gather about 6 or 8 yellow dock roots. They are long yellow tap roots, and difficult to dig up. Look for plants growing in moist ground, it’s a bit easier to dig them there. Dice up your roots and place them into a small saucepan. Pour in enough apple cider vinegar to just cover them and simmer over low to medium heat until the roots are soft. Put the roots through the blender or a sieve to mash them thoroughly. Scrape the vaseline out of the jar into a bowl and add the mashed roots. Add 1 teaspoon of the flowers of sulfur. Stir to mix completely. You can put the blend back into the vaseline jar. To use just apply to the affected area twice a day for about a week, or less if it goes away sooner.

8 Ways Not to Use Vinegar

8 Ways Not to Use Vinegar

  • Chaya, selected from Networx

By Adam Verwymeren, Networx

Common household vinegar is one of those wonder products that people are always discovering new uses for. Whether you want to drive away dandruff, eradicate mildew, or keep bugs at bay, vinegar has been proposed as a solution to just about every problem under the sun.

But while it has a number of uses, vinegar isn’t always the solution, and on occasion it can be downright dangerous. Here are the top 8 ways not to put this miracle substance to work in your home.

1. While vinegar is good at cleaning many things, you shouldn’t confuse it with soap. Alkaline cleaners like dish detergent are ideally suited for lifting grease, whereas vinegar will have little effect on it. If you have a greasy cleaning job, reach for regular soap and leave the vinegar on the shelf.

2. You should never use vinegar on waxed surfaces. The vinegar will only strip the wax off, dulling the sheen on your nicely shined car. However, vinegar is a great option if you’re looking to remove an old coat of wax before you put down a fresh layer of polish.

3. Do not use vinegar on marble countertops or other stoneware, as it can cause the stone to pit and corrode, according to the Marble Institute.

4. Your smartphone and laptop monitor probably have a thin layer of oleophobic coating that limits fingerprints and smudges. Acidic vinegar can strip this off, so you should never use it to clean sensitive screens.

5. Cast iron and aluminum are reactive surfaces. If you want to use vinegar to clean pots and pans, use it exclusively on stainless steel and enameled cast iron cookware.

6. While both bleach and vinegar are powerful cleaning agents, when mixed together they make a powerful chemical weapon. Chlorine gas, the stuff used to clear the trenches in World War I, results when bleach is mixed with an acidic substance, so never mix them together.

7. While vinegar can be useful as an insecticide, you shouldn’t spray it directly on bug-infested plants as it can damage them. However, you can use vinegar’s plant-killing effect to your advantage by using it as a weed killer, as suggested by several people on Hometalk.

8. If you’re the victim of an egging, do not try to dissolve the remnants of this prank away with vinegar. Vinegar will cause the proteins in the egg to coagulate, creating a gluey substance that is even more impossible to clean up, says Popular Mechanics.

I also feel obligated to say that although vinegar is touted as a great way to remove mildew and mold, like bleach it only kills surface mold. Most mold problems are deeper than what you see on the surface, and your best bet is to kill them at their source (which is usually leaks and rotting drywall).

To bring your enemy evil #2

To bring your enemy evil 2

Ingredients:
Dust from the tomb of an assassin’s victim.
India ink
Vinegar
Aguardiente
Salt
Red wine
Guinea pepper
Chinese pepper
Three needles
Nine pins
Three garlic bulbs
Snake fat
Cooking oil

Write your enemy’s name with India ink on a piece of paper. Pierce the paper with the nine pins and the three needles. Place it at the bottom of a clay pot. Cover the paper with nine pinches of dust, salt and the peppers. Add nine drops of India ink and vinegar, nine spoonful of aguardiente, and the garlic bulbs. Cover the mixture with cooking oil. Insert a wick.

Call a curse on your enemy as you light the lamp. Let it burn for nine days.

13 Natural Ingredients to Clean Almost Anything!

13 Natural Ingredients to Clean Almost Anything!

  • Jessica Kellner

Everyone wants a clean home, but clean these days means more than no dirt and grime. It also means no potentially toxic chemicals. Clean up your cleaning act by ditching toxic commercial cleansers in favor of homemade versions. With this list of grocery store basics, you can clean just about anything.

Shopping List

With these easy-to-find items, you can clean just about anything.

Baking Soda: scrubbing, whitening
Use baking soda to eliminate odors and to whiten. A paste of baking soda and water can help whiten sinks and bathtubs, and a box of baking soda in the fridge, bathroom or cupboard helps absorb odors.

Beeswax: polishing wood
You can forgo oily wood polish in favor of all-natural beeswax. Find a local beekeeper, and you support your local economy in the process!

Cornstarch and Club Soda (or any unflavored fizzy water): lifting stains
For a quick treatment to stains on carpets or drapes, cover the stain with absorbent cornstarch. Let it sit for about 20 minutes, then pour fizzy club soda to lift the stain. Also try cornstarch on oil dripped on clothing.

Hydrogen Peroxide: disinfecting, removing stains
Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful disinfectant. To kill mildew, combine baking soda and hydrogen peroxide to create a paste, put on mildew and allow to sit for a few minutes before wiping away.
Lemon: removing stains and odors
Lemons are a great all-purpose odor remover in the kitchen. Run half a lemon over a dirty cutting board to help remove odors such as onion or fish. Put half a lemon (chop it up if your disposal has trouble with large objects) down the disposal and grind it to remove odors from the kitchen sink. Lemon juice adds cleaning power to all-purpose solutions.

Liquid Castile Soap: sudsing power
Liquid castile soap is an all-natural, olive oil-based soap great for all-natural dishsoap, floor cleaner and more. For a floor or wall cleaner, combine a cup of vinegar with a gallon of hot water and a few drops of soap.

Olive Oil: polishing wood
Olive oil can naturally condition wood, as well as skin and hair!

Pine Oil: cleaning soft wood floors
Pine oil is naturally conditions wood floors, and it smells fresh.

Plant Essential Oils: chemical-free fragrance
Although they are chemical-free, pure essential oils are strong. Always do a sniff test before buying to make sure you’re not sensitive to the fumes, and use caution when handling pure essential oils. A few drops of essential oil can add antibacterial and antifungal power to a cleaning solution. Most important? They leave behind a fresh scent. Look for pure, undiluted essential oils in dark brown or blue bottles. Store away from sunlight.

Salt: scrubbing
Thick kosher salt gives power to your elbow grease. To clean stubborn soap scum, combine baking soda and kosher salt and scrub.

Washing Soda (sodium carbonate): scrubbing, removing stains and cutting grease
Washing soda is a powerful cleaning ingredient that acts much like baking soda but stronger. Use washing soda to clean toilets, or mix with water for a powerful all-purpose cleaner. Many natural cleaners recommend borax, but recent studies by the Environmental Working Group have found that it’s overly harsh. You can replace borax with slightly milder washing soda in nearly any recipe

White Vinegar: disinfecting, removing stains
White vinegar is a powerhouse of cleaning. Disinfecting and deodorizing, vinegar is a go-to product for germ-ridden spots such as countertops, door handles and telephones.

Juniper Spell (1) Hot Mama Douche

Soul mate? Perhaps all you desire is to find a fun, vigorous, exciting lover. This hoodoo formulation takes a little while to prepare but promises quick, exciting solutions.

  1. Make juniper vinegar, warm apple cider or wine vinegar on the stove. Add a handful of bruised juniper berries. Let it simmer for a little while, then bottle in an air tight container. Allow this to sit for at least two weeks, and then strain out the berries.

  2. When you’re ready to use it, dilute with warm water or a hydrosol.

  3. Used as a douche, this is said to draw men like the proverbial flies.

A Pioneer’s Apothecary

TO RELIEVE A COUGH, squeeze the juice of one large onion and add one tablespoon of honey. Take one teaspoon three or four times daily. Apply the onion to the chest, “mashing it well.”

Mix two teaspoons of cider vinegar in water or wine. Sip one tablespoon four times daily.

Combine two tablespoons of honey with one tablespoon of grated horseradish root to sooth a cough.

Make a tea of one teaspoon grated nutmeg in one cup of hot cider. Drink three times daily.