WEDNESDAY – The Day of Wisdom, The Day of Mercury

WEDNESDAY

The Day of Wisdom
 The Day of Mercury

wodensdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
mittwoch (Germanic)
dies mercurii (Latin)
budh-var (Hindu)
boodh (Islamic)
mercredi (French)
sui youbi (Japanese

Traditionally known as the fourth day of the week. This day was associated with Odin the God of War, Wisdom, Agriculture and Poetry. He was also regarded as the God of the Dead. The Anglo-Saxons changed the name from ‘Odin’s Day’ to ‘Woden’s Day’, whilst the French referred to the day as ‘Mercredi’ or ‘Mercury’s Day’, Mercury being the God of Science, Commerce, Travellers, Rogues, and Thieves. In most of Europe Wednesday was thought to be a very unlucky day whilst in the USA quite the opposite was believed as the following New England rhyme shows: ‘Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best of all.
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
And Saturday no luck at all!’ The above rhyme has according to research also been associated with selecting days to get married. The Persians associated Wednesday with the name ‘Red Letter Day’. It is believed that this was because they believed that the moon was created on this day. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

TUESDAY, The Day of Mars
, The Day of Honour

TUESDAY

The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

MONDAY, The Day of the Moon

MONDAY

The Day of the Moon

monandaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
montag (Germanic)
dies lunae (Latin)
som-var (Hindu)
peer or somwar (Islamic)
lundi (French)
getsu youbi (Japanese

This is traditionally viewed as the second day of the week. Although known as ‘Monandaeg’ by the Angle-Saxons it was also known as ‘the day of the moon’. ‘Black Monday’ was the term given to 14 April 1360 which was an Easter Monday. King Edward III of England had laid siege to Paris but was plagued by the weather as it turned foul and dark.. As a result it is said that many men and their mounts were lost in battle. The fact that this event is said to have occurred on Easter Monday is disputed, being later said to have occurred on the Tuesday, but ever since the Monday after Easter has been given this name. On 25 February 1865 a terrifying wind rose up in Melbourne, Australia coming from the NNW. Devastation hit an immense area of land between Castlemaine and Sandhurst, known after by this name. According to tradition it was believed that there were three specific Mondays of the year that were considered to be unlucky. The first Monday in April, the second in August, and the last in the month of December. It is said that Cain was born on the first Monday in April, and that later it was upon this day that he killed his brother Abel. Sodom and Gommorah was said to be destroyed on the second Monday in August, and that it was upon this day in December that Judas Iscariot was born. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

Sunday, The Day of the Sun

SUNDAY

The Day of the Sun

sunnandaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
sonntag (Germanic)
dies solis (Latin)
ravi-var (Hindu)
etwar (Islamic)
dimanche (French)
nichi youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the first day of the week by the ancient Hebrews and as identified by the fourth commandment (Exodus, xx, 8-11). This day was in ancient times dedicated to the Sun and later as ‘The Lord’s Day’. Sunday is traditionally a time for rest, reflection and worship. It is believed to be a lucky day for babies born on this day according to tradition as the child was thought to be safe from witches and evil spirits. Some born on this day are believed to have psychic or devining abilities. Any cures that are administered on a Sunday were believed to be more likely to succeed. In some parts of the British Isles (UK) there is a belief that announces that any agreements that are made on a Sunday are not legal as it will offend God to make any transactions of a day of reflection and dedicated to worship. In the USA this is enforced by the saying ‘ Never make plans on a Sunday’. In rural areas of the British Isles those employed for a new job on a Sunday would soon leave their post:

‘Saturday servants never stay,

Sunday servants run away.’

It was also thought to be unlucky to put clean sheets on the bed on a Sunday along with cutting your hair or nails. Regarding music, choir singers who sang a false note on this day were according to a traditional English (UK) belief expected to have a burnt Sunday dinner. You could expect a busy profitable week ahead, especially if you were in business, if you found a pair of gloves on this day, and quite naturally very unlucky to be the person who had lost them according to a rural English (UK) belief. A prehistoric cairn marks the spot of Druid worship where a Christian settlement was created Slieve Donhard, near Newcastle, England. Set up by Donhard (a convert of St. Patrick), pilgrimages regularly visit the place of worship, high on the hill, as it is said that St. Patrick himself appears as a result of Donhard’s faith each Sunday of the year. As he appears before everyone, it is said that St. Patrick also leads the people in the mass.  According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

THURSDAY – The Day of Strength,The Day of Jupiter

Days Of The Week Comments

 THURSDAY

The Day of Strength
 The Day of Jupiter

thursdaeg (Anglo-Saxon) donnerstag (Germanic) dies jovis (Latin) vrihaspat-var or guru-var (Hindu) jumerat (Islamic) jeudi (French) moku youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the fifth day of the week. Originally associated with two gods, ‘Jove’ and ‘Thor’. Thor was the God of Thunder hence the day also being known a ‘Thunderday’. Jove was also known to be associated with thunder, with the French renaming the day ‘Jeudi’ which means ‘Jove’s Day’. ‘Maundy Thursday’ is the Thursday before Good Friday when in the Roman Catholic faith, the preparation of washing the feet begins. Traditionally those of high office within the church, including royalty would wash the feet of the poor on this day. In John, xiii, 34, the ceremony is outlined with ‘Mandatum novum do vobis’ meaning ‘a new commandment I give unto you’. The washing of the feet is associated with Jesus washing the feet of the poor, and also too of Mary of Magdala washing the feet of Jesus. In Germany (Europe) Thursday was believed traditionally to be the most unluckiest of the week. As a result the practice grew of ensuring that no important business should be carried out, no marriages and even that no child should be sent to school for their first time on this day. ‘Black Thursday’ was the name given to February 6 1851 in Australia when a powerful fire swept in from the bush to blaze a trail across Victoria. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.  Columba, or Columcille is associated with this day, as it is known that he was born on a Thursday in 521, on the 7 December. The Celtic church notes this feast day as 7 June, revered across the British Isles and Brittany as a truly sacred man of God hence the association in ancient times of this being a holy day.

Wednesday: The Day of Wisdom, The Day of Mercury

WEDNESDAY

The Day of Wisdom
 The Day of Mercury

wodensdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
mittwoch (Germanic)
dies mercurii (Latin)
budh-var (Hindu)
boodh (Islamic)
mercredi (French)
sui youbi (Japanese

Traditionally known as the fourth day of the week. This day was associated with Odin the God of War, Wisdom, Agriculture and Poetry. He was also regarded as the God of the Dead. The Anglo-Saxons changed the name from ‘Odin’s Day’ to ‘Woden’s Day’, whilst the French referred to the day as ‘Mercredi’ or ‘Mercury’s Day’, Mercury being the God of Science, Commerce, Travellers, Rogues, and Thieves. In most of Europe Wednesday was thought to be a very unlucky day whilst in the USA quite the opposite was believed as the following New England rhyme shows: ‘Monday for health,
Tuesday for wealth,
Wednesday the best of all.
Thursday for losses,
Friday for crosses,
And Saturday no luck at all!’ The above rhyme has according to research also been associated with selecting days to get married. The Persians associated Wednesday with the name ‘Red Letter Day’. It is believed that this was because they believed that the moon was created on this day. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

 

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

The Yule Log

The Yule Log
by Lila

The tradition of the Yule logs dates back millennia. The origin of the word Yule seems to originate from the Anglo Saxon word for sun and light. People used to burn a yule log on the Winter Solstice in December. The Winter Solstice is the day of the year with the shortest amount of daylight. Yule is celebrated by fire, which provides a dual role of warmth and keeping evil spirits away. Many people thought that evil spirits were more likely to wander the earth on the longest night of the year. All night bonfires and hearth fires kept evil at bay and provided gathering places for folks to share feasts and stories.

Winter Solstice marks the sun’s victory over darkness; the days would now grow longer. The cinders from the burnt log were thought to protect homes from lightning and the evil powers of the devil. The ashes were also sprinkled on the surrounding fields to ensure good luck for the coming year’s harvest. The largest remaining part of the log was kept safe to kindle next year’s fire.

The Yule log has waned in popularity with the advent of electric heaters and wood stoves. With no access to a hearth, fireplace or fire pit, modern folks are losing a sacred tradition. Today, we may still partake of the Yule Log tradition by creating a smaller version as a table ornament, embellished with greenery and candles, or the popular Yule log cake. As we eat a slice, we can imagine taking in the protective properties of the log.

Many enjoy the practice of lighting the Yule Log. If you choose to burn one, select a log and carve or chalk upon it a figure of the Sun (a rayed disc) or the Horned God (a horned circle). Set it alight in the fireplace at dusk, on Yule. This is a graphic representation of the rebirth of the God within the sacred fire of the Mother Goddess. As the log burns, visualize the Sun shining within it and think of the coming warmer days. Traditionally, a portion of the Yule Log is saved to be used in lighting next year’s log. This piece is kept throughout the year to protect the home.

Whether you are burning a log or creating a centrepiece, different woods may be used to produce different effects:
Aspen: invokes understanding of the grand design
Birch: signifies new beginnings
Holly: inspires visions and reveals past lives
Oak: brings healing, strength, and wisdom, symbol of the Oak king, the New year
Pine: signifies prosperity and growth
Willow: invokes the Goddess to achieve desires
Decorate your log with the any of the following items:
bright green needles of fir represents the birth of the new year
dark green needles of yew represent death of the waning year
vines of ivy or birch branches represent the Goddess
sprigs of holly with red berries represent the Holly king of the dying year
As you light the Yule log chant the following:

As the yule log is kindled
so is the new year begun
as it has been down through the ages
an unending cycle of birth, death, and rebirth
every ending is a new beginning
May the Yule log burn
May all good enter here
May there be wheat for bread
and vats full of wine
(or may we never hunger may we never thirst)

When the log has almost completely burned, collect a small piece of the Yule log (dip in a bucket of water to ensure it is completely out) wrap carefully and keep somewhere in the home for safety and protection.

collect some of the cold ashes and store in a glass bottle. The ash can be used for spells of protection and amulets. The remainder of the Yule ash can be scattered over fields or gardens to ensure fertility in the spring.

Pauline Campanelli; Wheel of the Year

Lila is an initiate in The Sacred Three Goddess school. She lives on a mountain in beautiful British Columbia with her husband, four cats, two ferrets and other varied critters of nature. She spends her time communing with the Faerie folk and long walks by the river.

Today’s Runes for Monday, June 4 is Ger

 

Ice Runes are most commonly used for questions about struggle, conflict, and achievement. Ger is one of the runes that touches on the cycles of the year, in this case the fall harvest. These cycles are eternal, which is represented in the rune by the fact that it is unchanged by reversal. Ger can represent pregnancy or other forms of fruitfulness, and is especially indicative of the cycles of providence and karma – that which has been sown is now being reaped. This rune can also represent the cycles of wealth, for crops were frequently a sign of wealth.

Nine Sisters Chant

Nine Sisters Chant

 
To be recite nine times over a wound, tumor, or infection three times a day for twenty-one days (or less, should the wound close quickly). This Anglo-Saxon leechbook chant can also be used repetitively to remove evil from the home as the household is sprinkled with holy water and censed with a burning banishment herb, such as sage.
 
Nine were Noththe’s sisters.
Then the nine became eight
and the eight became seven
and the seven became six
and the six became five
and the five became four
and the four became three
and the three became two
and the two became one
and the one became none
 
Follow by drawing the equal-armed cross in the air and saying “It is so.”

Herb of the Day for August 10th is Valerian

Valerian

Valerian was named for the physician Valerius, one of the first to use the plant medicinally. Around the eleventh century, Anglo-Saxon leeches recommend its use in battling menstrual cramps. It was called Amantilla during the middle ages, and there is a recipe which recommends the use of a tea made from “the juice of Amantilla id est Valeriana,” to bring about peace between warring factions. Chaucer refers to the plant as Setwall.

Traditionally, valerian was used more often for medicine than magic, but there are still some uses for it in spellwork.

Valerian may smell raunchy, but it’s also known as a plant of love and protection. Hang it in your home to protect against natural disasters, such as lightning strikes or fire. If you’re a woman, pin a sprig to your shirt to attract men your way. Quarrels can be resolved in a home by placing valerian leaves around the perimeter of the house.

If you are fighting with a family member, try putting a sprig of valerian in each corner of your home. Putting it over each door will prevent strife and discontent from entering — but be warned – some people find that the smell of valerian reminds them of cat urine.

Other Names: All-heal, Heliotrope, St. George’s herb, Amantilla, Setwall
Gender: Feminine
Element: Water
Deity Connection: Aphrodite, Venus
Planetary Connection: Venus

If you’re a gardener, valerian tends to attract earthworms, which are great for your soil. This has to do with the levels of phosphorus produced by the plant’s roots, so if you need wormy dirt, plant some valerian.

 

About.com