Today’s I Ching Hexagram for December 20th is 43: Determination

43: Determination

Thursday, Dec 20th, 2012

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Personal resolution points to a breakthrough, but decisive action is required. As long as you diligently hold your ground and ward off negative tendencies and influences, the good will prevail.

The persistence of negativity, which is that which opposes the good, is a constant in human affairs. Just when it is thought to have been eradicated, up it will pop again, sprouting through some crack in the pavement of civilized society. Evil need not take dramatic or extravagant forms, such as those exhibited in Nazi Germany. Garden-variety lies and deceit are much more common and persistent, but should be rooted out just as diligently. One must be determined to not accidentally feed negativity — either in one’s social or professional life, or in one’s own soul. In either case, definite rules must be followed for the struggle to succeed.

The first rule: do not compromise with evil. Destructive or exploitive actions must be identified openly for what they are, and discredited. The second: one cannot successfully resist negativity on its own terms. New, positive alternatives that lead away from the source of the problem are generally more successful, and appropriate than trying to counter negativity with raw power. The third rule: the means used to counter negativity must be consistent with the end to be achieved. One cannot stop the spreading of lies by spreading more of them.

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Today’s I Ching Hexagram for July 27th is 43: Determination

43: Determination

Hexagram 43

General Meaning: Personal resolution points to a breakthrough, but decisive action is required. As long as you diligently hold your ground and ward off negative tendencies and influences, the good will prevail.

The persistence of negativity, which is that which opposes the good, is a constant in human affairs. Just when it is thought to have been eradicated, up it will pop again, sprouting through some crack in the pavement of civilized society. Evil need not take dramatic or extravagant forms, such as those exhibited in Nazi Germany. Garden-variety lies and deceit are much more common and persistent, but should be rooted out just as diligently. One must be determined to not accidentally feed negativity — either in one’s social or professional life, or in one’s own soul. In either case, definite rules must be followed for the struggle to succeed.

The first rule: do not compromise with evil. Destructive or exploitive actions must be identified openly for what they are, and discredited. The second: one cannot successfully resist negativity on its own terms. New, positive alternatives that lead away from the source of the problem are generally more successful, and appropriate than trying to counter negativity with raw power. The third rule: the means used to counter negativity must be consistent with the end to be achieved. One cannot stop the spreading of lies by spreading more of them.

Did You Know……..

Did you know…

From Wikipedia’s newest content:

A group of passing-by people, including two children stopped at a child lying face down on a street

  • … that among the Jewish ghettos in German-occupied Poland the most populous was the Warsaw Ghetto (pictured) with over 400,000 inhabitants crammed into an area of 1.3 sq mi (3.4 km2)?
  • … that The Herald said the character Manda from Alan Warner’s 2010 novel The Stars in the Bright Sky was “the most vivid, aggravating lynchpin in recent Scottish fiction”?
  • … that when the SS Ava was wrecked off the coast of Ceylon in February 1858, her passengers included Lady Julia Inglis and her sons, John and Alfred, who were evacuees from the Siege of Lucknow, and the ship’s doctor, James Little, who was later to become Honorary Physician to King George V?
  • … that Temple III at the Maya city of Tikal in Guatemala was the last pyramid ever built there?
  • … that Green Seamount, an underwater volcano, could have taken up to 260,000 years to reach its present height?
  • … that, in 1933, when attempts were made to restore the monarchy in Bavaria to stall the Nazis’ rise to power, Adolf Hitler warned the Bavarian government that this would lead to a “terrible catastrophe”?
  • … that although Jeremy Howard-Williams was a fighter pilot, he wrote the “classic account of the sail-maker’s art”?

Did You Know……

Did you know…

From Wikipedia’s newest content:

 Arbol de Piedra, a tree-like piece of rock eroded by the wind

  • … that the Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve contains a “stone tree” (pictured)?
  • … that during World War II, Wyoming State Senator Robert H. Johnson flew bombing missions in support of the French Resistance against the Nazis?
  • … that although wine production is important to the economy of Tequisquiapan in Mexico, the locals do not generally consume it?
  • … that journalist Sony Esteus had his arm broken by the Port-au-Prince police while covering a story?
  • … that Hockey: Canada’s Royal Winter Game, published in 1899, was the first book on ice hockey, and only four copies are now known to exist?
  • … that Frederick Settle Barff invented a device, similar to a catalytic converter, to remove SO2 and CO2 from the exhaust fumes of locomotives in the 1860s?
  • … that reportedly haunted locations in Scotland include a tenement where bubonic plague victims were quarantined and starved to death by local councilmen?

Did You Know…….

Did you know…

From Wikipedia’s newest content:

View of a wide lit tunnel stretching into the distance

  • … that the underground Fortress of Mimoyecques (pictured) was built by Nazi Germany to bombard London with 10 shells a minute using the V-3 supergun?
  • … that the competition to build the fastest production motorcycle raged for over a century, and then ended in a truce?
  • … that Indian communist leader V. Subbiah was elected to the Senate of France in 1947?
  • … that DarkOrbit is an online game that gives players a chance to win up to £10,000 of real cash?
  • … that Judge Hugo Friend, who presided over the 1921 Black Sox trial, smiled as the defendants were acquitted and died in 1966 while listening by radio to a White Sox game?
  • … that a proud Massachusetts father commissioned award-winning composer Peter Child to compose a string quartet in honor of his son’s birth?
  • … that the wasp Dinocampus coccinellae can turn a ladybird into a “zombie bodyguard”?

Today’s Featured Picture

Today’s featured picture

A synagogue on D-Day A synagogue on West Twenty-Third Street in New York City remained open 24 hours on D-Day for special services and prayer. Jews in the U.S. during World War II were mostly unaware of the atrocities of The Holocaust, beyond the basic facts that Jews were being persecuted by the Nazis. Arthur Hays Sulzberger, publisher of The New York Times and a Jew himself, was anti-Zionist and downplayed much of the news. Furthermore, Jewish studio executives of major film studios did not want to be accused of advocating Jewish propaganda by making films with overtly antifascist themes.

Photo: Farm Security Administration; Restoration: Lise Broer