Daily OM For November 18th – Children of Mother Nature

Children Of Mother Nature

Trees And People

A tree that is beginning to grow sends roots down into Mother Earth even as it reaches and opens to the sky above, seeking nourishment from the sun and the moisture in the air and in the rain that falls. In the same way, we can envision ourselves as treelike beings, imagining that we have roots reaching down into the earth, energetic strands that keep us connected. At the same time, the crowns of our heads lift and open to receive nourishment from above. Just like a tree, we seek the sunshine and water we need to survive and thrive. Both trees and people serve as conduits for the intermingling of the opposite and complementary elements of air, water, sun, and earth.

We also share creative ways of growing, regardless of the challenges we come up against in our environments. Trees will even grow through rock, shattering it, in their effort to reach the air and light they need to survive. We are similarly resilient, with a built-in propensity for growth and the conditions that promote it. We find creative ways around the obstacles we confront as we move along our paths, moving toward the light that feeds us, just as trees grow around other trees and rocks as they make their way upward.

Contemplating the ways in which trees and people mirror one another brings us into alignment with the reality that we are part of Mother Nature. Our children, and the trees and their children, will live together on the earth as long as we all survive, sharing the elements and serving together to forward nature’s plan. Walking in a forest can be a meditation, the interweaving lives of all living creatures and the planet on which we all take root and reach for the sky.

Advertisements

Herbal Etiquette

Herbal Etiquette

by Amber S.

When studying herbology within witchcraft, it is important to learn about how plants work and the best ways to gather our stores, whether they come from wild plants or plants in our garden. There is more to herbs and trees than meets the eye.
All things have a soul: rocks, trees, animals and people. The soul is the energy of an object that exists in the same place and time as the physical body. Things that exist on the physical plane can be seen on the astral plane because of their energy. When you remove part of a plant, it is customary and proper to ask before you take any part of it and thank the plant once you have finished.
Plants that you grow and raise in your garden do not need to be asked for their permission to take leaves and flowers. Because they depend on you for protection and sustenance, you can remove what you need when you need it. It is an understood relationship between the grower and the plants. They give their leave and fruit in exchange for protection and care. Prayers and spells should be said over the crop at significant times such as planting, watering, pruning, and harvesting.
Wild plants are a little different. these plants are dependant on themselves for their health and survival. When you remove part of a plant, you must first ask the plant. Do this by closing your eyes and imagine just for a moment what you want from the tree. Normally, you will get no answer in return or a feeling of acceptance, in which case, you may remove what you need. Occasionally, however, you will receive a feeling of mistrust or an uncomfortable feeling telling you that you may not remove any part of the plant, in which case, you must move on.

When gathering wild herbs:- Never remove the bark from a tree. Bark covers a tree to keep out disease and fungus just the way our skin does for us. removing the bark can result in infection and the death of the tree. If you need bark for a recipe, remove twigs instead and strip the bark from the removed twigs with a knife.
– Try not to remove the entire plant. If possible, take only a few leaves or flowers and move on.
-Always ask a plant before you remove any part of it.
-Always thank plants after you have taken from them.

Plants are very sacred to witches. All plants should be given homage when we take something from them. There are many different ways of giving thanks. Any act of devotion is acceptable. Traditionally, gifts of apple cider, milk, honey, tobacco, or prayer are given. You can also give shiny coins or fertilizer as a gift. If you have nothing to give, a prayer for the health and well-being of the plant is more than sufficient. Leaving gifts for the tree spirits is also a good thank-you idea. Fairies enjoy music. Performing a song and dance for them is also a good thing to do if you have not brought any gifts with you.

Ancient Names for Herbs

Ancient  Names for Herbs

Long ago, before many herbs were known by  their present names, many herbs that were used by people in the country for medicines and food were called by common names which were usually based on what the herb or its flower, leaves, roots, or seeds looked like. These names have flowered modern stories of witches creating a brew of batswing, rat’s tail, and lady’s finger. These were not the actual ingredients of the potions, but rather common names used to describe what each herb resembled. Below is a list of old herb names.

Modern Name Olde English Name
Adder’s Tongue Serpent’s Tongue
Agaric Death Angel
Agrimony Church Steeples
Ague Root Crow Corn
Alyssum Madwort
Amaranth Red Cock’s Comb
American Valerian Ram’s Head
Ash Weed Goat’s Foot
Aster Eyes
Asafoetida Devil’s Dung
Avens Herb Harefoot, Golden Star
Bachelor’s Button Devil’s Flower
Basil Witches Herb
Bay laurel Blue Jay
Bear’s Breech Gall blood from a shoulder
Belladonna Devil’s Cherries
Betony Lamb’s Ear
Bistort Snakeweed, Dragon scales
Black Haw King’s Crown
Bladderwack Sea Spirit
Briony Snake Grape
Bromeliad Earthstar
Buckthorn Bone of an ibis
Bugleweed Wolf Foot
Burdock Beggar’s Buttons
Calmus Sweet Flag
Carrot Bird’s Nest
Cedar Kronos Blood
Celandine Devil’s Milk
Chamomile Blood of Hestia
Cherry tree gum Brains
Chickweed Tongue Grass
Cinquefoil Five Fingers
Clover Semen of Ares
Club Moss Wolfclaw, foxtail
Coltsfoot Coltsfoot
Comfrey Ear of an Ass
Common Plantain Englishman’s Foot
Couch Grass Dog
Cowslip Fairy’s Cup
Cranesbill Crow’s Foot
Dandelion Lion’s tooth, Priest’s crown
Dandelion Leaves Swine’s snout
Datura Witch’s thimble, Devil’s apple
Dill Semen of Hermes
Dill Juice             Tears of a Hamadryas Baboon
Dill Seed             Hair of a Hamadryas Baboon
Dodder Witches Hair, Devil’s guts
Earth Apple from the belly
Elder Sap blood
Euphorbia Wolf’s milk
Fenugreek bird’s foot
Fern Skin of man
Foxglove Foxglove, bloody fingers
Garlic, Wild Eagle
Geranium, Wild Dove’s Foot
Germander Bird’s eye
Golden Seal Indian dye
Goosegrass Gosling Wing
Great Mullein Hares Beard
Ground Ivy Cat’s foot
Hart’s Tongue Fern Horse’s tongue
Hawkweed hawk
Heliotrope cherry pie
Henbane devil’s eye
Holly Leaf Bat’s Wings
Honeysuckle Goat’s Leaf
Hops Nightingale
Horehound Bull’s blood
Horsetail Paddock Pipes
Hound’s tongue dog’s tongue
Houseleek from the foot
Hydrangea Seven barks
Indian Paintbrush Snake’s friend
Knotweed sparrow’s tongue
Lady’s mantle bear’s foot
Lavender Elf Leaf
Lettuce Lamb
Leopard’s bane pig’s tail
Lupine Blood from a head
May Apple Duck’s Foot
Molukka Fairies’ Eggs
Moss Bat’s Wool
Mugwort Old Man
Mulberry tree sap blood of a goose
Mullein graveyard dust
Mustard Semen of Heracles
Ox Eye Daisy Great Ox Eye
Pansy Bird’s eye
Parsley Devil’s Oatmeal
Pennyroyal Organ Tea
Peony Woodpecker
Periwinkle Devil’s Eye
Pimpernel Poorman’s Weatherglass
Pine Cones Teeth
Plantain Adder’s Tongue
Poppy Blind eyes
Purslane Blood of Ares
Ragwort Fairies Horses
Resin of Draco Palm Dragon’s Blood
Rosemary Elf Leaf
Rowan Thor’s Helper
Rue Weasel
Sage Toad
Shepherd’s Purse Shepherd’s Heart
Skullcap Mushroom Skull
Snapdragon Dog’s Mouth, Calf’s Snout
Spurge Fat from a head
St. Johnswort Goat’s Ears
Tamarisk Blood of an eye
Tansy Buttons
Toadflax Dragon Bushes
Tormentil Flesh and Blood
Tongue of a Turnip Lion’s hair
Turnip Sap Man’s bile
Valerian Rat, Capon’s Tail
Walnut Heart
White Hellebore Semen of Helios
Wild Lettuce Titan’s blood
Wolfs bane wolf’s hat
Woodruff master of the woods
Wormwood Crown for a King, Old woman
Wormwood seed hawk’s heart
Yarrow Devil’s nettle, Nosebleed

Calendar of the Moon for July 14

Calendar of the Moon

14 Tinne/Hekatombaion

Day of the Spindle Tree

Color: Pale yellow
Element: Earth
Altar: Upon a pale yellow cloth set a vase of spindle-tree twigs, a single pale yellow candle, a pot of soil, seeds of some medicinal or useful herb, a bowl of water, and a bell.
Offerings: Plant seeds. Do some handcraft.
Daily Meal: Vegan

Invocation to the Green Man of the Spindle Tree

Hail, Green Man of the Summer!
Spindle tree of the craftsman’s pride,
You who have been carved and sectioned
Into spools, wands, and many other things,
You who pride yourself on being useful,
Guide our hands as we turn
Things of nature into things of use.
Show us the beauty in pure function
And in pure service,
In the comfort that comes
Of being a worthy tool
And a well-worked object.
Remind us of the satisfaction
In the creation of some new thing
That will please the hands
Of many generations to come.
We hail you, sacred spindle tree,
Green Man of the Summer,
On this your day of labor.

Song: Fashioned in the Clay by Elmer Beal

(Each comes forward and plants a seed in the pot of soil, saying, “Hail Green Man of the Earth!” Water is poured onto the pot, and then the rest is poured out as a libation. Ring bell and dismiss.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

ENCHANTING YOURSELF SPELL

ENCHANTING YOURSELF SPELL

Go to a flower shop and find a red rose, the best one that you can find.
Take it home and say these words,
“Whatever it is that (she) is attracted to is contained within this rose.”
Visualize rose colored energy coming from your genitals into the rose.
Now crush the rose into powder and keep it in a small package.
Lace some of your key chain with it everyday you know that you will see her.
When you do, put your hand in your pocket and touch the keys.

A Garden Dedication (Earth Magick)

A Garden Dedication

A special god or goddess garden can be wonderful addition to your landscaping with a small amount of planning. As an example, we will look at a garden dedicated to Hecate. Hecate is the ruler of the three-way crossroads, so if it is possible to place her garden close to one, it would be a smart choice. Traditionally, altars dedicated to Hecate were erected at such locations. For plant choices, look up her history and choose plants that have symbolic connection to her, such as the poppy flower, azalea bush, and cypress tree. For decoration, a lantern is a good choice, as Hecate is said to always carry a torch and to be the embodiment of a living flame. A statue is always a wise choice as well.

In your overall landscaping, you can place a small tribute garden to Hecate where the paths meet in a three way-crossroads, if you have no actual roads near your gardens. This is probably the safer choice to avoid toxic fumes from vehicles bothering your delicate plants.

Once the planting is complete, it is time to dedicate the garden. If you included any sort of altar components in your design, simply set it up for use. If you didn’t you can erect a temporary altar from a garden bench or large stone. If you can plan your planting schedule around the moon phases, so much the better. The dedication ritual should ideally be performed under a full moon.

Supplies:

A chalice, filled with a sweet red wine

Several sticks of willow or sandalwood incense

4 clear quartz crystals, programmed with growth and love

Go around the garden and place the incense sticks in the ground. Light them and blow out the flames so that they begin to smoke. Once the aroma begins to drift through the gardens, say something along the lines of, “This smoke consecrates this garden as sacred ground. Only love and light may enter here.”

Next, take the crystals and bury them at the cardinal points while calling upon the universal energies of each direction to aid your garden in its task to thrive. Be specific and ask each direction to bless the garden and leave behind some of its essence. Important note: You are not calling the corners per se, so a dismissal is not mandatory. However, if you feel you should include one, by all means do so.

Now walk the circle with the chalice in hand, and splash the wine about the garden. Say, “I dedicate this land and all it contains to Hecate. Blessed it shall be. May it thrive and hold fast to her honor. As it is sacred ground, no one may pollute it. Hecate, come and dwell in your sanctuary!” Clap your hands three times. The dedication is now complete.

Tend this garden faithfully but allow for nature to run its course. Hecate may have plans to add a plant here and there, and this should be allowed. However, you should remove any weeds (especially those that are not related to Hecate) and, if necessary water the ground. Accept the notion that Hecate will reside with you as long as this area is maintained properly.

You can create a generic goddess garden by following the basic outline of a moon garden. Moon gardens frequently include all the silvery herbs as opposed to the greener varieties. They often feature gazing gloves, wind chimes, white stones for pathways, and white stone benches for relaxing. Moon gardens often delight scents, as most of the flowers are very aromatic.

If you decide to incorporate lighting into a moon-garden design, keep it subtle and stick to pathways only. You want the moonlight to reflect off of the white and silvery plants, creating a glow. Important note: When sitting in a moon garden at night, it is not unusual to be attacked by insects. Prepare yourself beforehand with a solution of mint essential oil diluted in rubbing alcohol.

Magickal Gardening (Earth Magick)

Magickal Gardening

 Magickal and healing herb gardens are sanctuaries of the soul. Indeed, any garden is a magickal on to the Witch.

The earliest formal record of gardening dates back to a stone tablet from Mesopotamia circa 4000 BC. It describes how Enki, the Sumerian God of Water, provided fresh water to the dry land and thereby produced fruit trees and fields from a desert like land. By 2250 BC, the famed Hanging Gardens of Babylon were well established in the capital of Sumeria. These are considered to be the forerunners of gardens today.

In Ancient Persia, (modern day Iraq), gardens were the playground of life. They serves as a place of solace, a gathering place for friends and family, and a formal extension of the home outdoors. These gardens were called “Paradise” and were thought to be an earthly view of what heaven must be like. They were cultivated carefully and tended to lovingly. Due to the desert conditions of the area, the gardens were usually enclosed by high walls. Many had aqueducts installed to maintain the irrigation needed for the gardens to thrive. Most often these gardens were formed into a square pattern and further divided into four smaller squares. Fountains and water channels were an important part of the architecture of the gardens. The gardens were said to have two of every fruit tree and plenty of places for sitting so that one could rest and enjoy the view.

Zen gardening is considered an art form by many. A Zen garden is a dry-landscape style of garden consisting of sand trails raked into intricate patterns. Often, the trails are not made of sand at all but rather a crushed type of granite, a very fine gravel. Many times the gravel pathways circle a rock or bush. The purpose of Zen gardening (the raking of the gravels) is to provoke contemplation and meditation. These gardens are thought to be very peaceful and restful to the eyes.

Traditional Japanese gardens invoke a sense of peace and tranquility in both the gardener and the person lucky enough to view the garden. According to the principles of Japanese gardening, each element introduced must be something that could occur naturally. For example, you can find a waterfall in nature, but not a fountain. Hence, a fountain has no place in a traditional Japanese garden.

Knot gardens are by far one of the most fantastical types of magickal gardens. They can weave a spell right into the landscape. A know garden is a very formal, precise arrangement of plants and tress. To create a magickal knot garden, choose an herb that corresponds to your intent and plant it in a pattern. The pattern can be as intricate or a simple as you wish. It can be a symbol, meant to reaffirm the spell, or any pattern that you like.

The ancient Romans brought their gardens inside the home and invented the atrium. Many times the atrium was placed in the center of the home. The area was left roofless and was usually surrounded by walkways. It may have held reflecting pools, herbal gardens and fruit trees.

One of today’s most popular magickal-gardening practices is moon gardening. This technique uses an ancient system of moon phases and astrological placements to calculate planting and harvesting times. In a moon garden, white and night blooming flowers are the main ornaments.

Planting Seeds at Imbolc

Planting Seeds at Imbolc

By C. Cheek

When I was a student at UW, I walked to class every day from my apartment. Along the way, I’d pass some less-than-beautiful sights; empty lots, alleys, easements, and the crud that gathers near gutters in parking lots. Not to worry, I assured myself, come spring, flowers would grow, filling these ugly spots with bursts of color. But then April came, and May, and June, and the route I walked to school stayed barren. Nature provided the sun, soil and rain, but no one had planted seeds.

Sometimes life just hands us what we need. Sometimes all we have to do is wait. And sometimes we have to do a little helping on our own. An envelope sits in my coat pocket. Inside this envelope are seeds mixed with sand to make them spread farther. Some of the seeds I purchased at stores, some I gathered last summer. Now, whenever I pass a patch of dirt, I’ll sow some of those seeds, and with them, I’ll sow a little hope. Hope is the time between planting a seed and seeing it bloom, or die. Hope is when you hear the phone ring and don’t know yet if it’s your best friend. Hope is the moment between buying a lottery ticket and scratching off that final square. When I was child, my mother often told me that wanting was better than having. It took me many years to find out what she meant. Even if your seeds don’t sprout, even if it’s a telemarketer on the other end of the line, and even if you don’t win the lottery, for a brief moment, possibility shines.

Getting in touch with Imbolc means gathering a kernel of hope. For me, as a writer, this means sending out my manuscripts. I call it “applying for rejection letters.” I read the editor’s requirements, check over my story for loose commas, type up a query letter, double check the spelling of the editor’s name, put the pages in an envelope with an extra SASE, and wait. Query letters have a germination period of about three months. At the end of three months, I’ll usually get a tiny slip of paper, not much bigger than a cookie’s fortune, which reads “Thank you for your submission, but it does not suit our current needs.” These little slips of paper cut me, they wound me, they callously toss aside what I’ve spent months writing. So, I find another name, and send it out again. Why? Why do I keep sending the stories out again and again? Because for three months, I can imagine how great it will feel to get an acceptance letter. In my fantasies, an acceptance letter turns into a three-book contract. My daydreams take root, and soon I’m the next J. K. Rowling, with legions of adoring fans, and respect of fellow authors, and book tours in Europe and then… and then…

And then, most likely, I’ll get a slip of paper, or maybe even a letter written just for me, telling me “No thank you.” But for those three months, the daydreams flourish, as sweet as the bite of chocolate you imagine just before tearing off the foil and wrapper, when the bar of candy lies unopened, waiting in your hand. Hope is rich soil, seeded with maybes.Providencewill decide if I happen to write the right letter to the right editor, and if she’s in the mood to read my work. Nature decides if the wildflower seeds I scratched into the mud will grow into seedlings. Even if my efforts don’t bear fruit, I’m guaranteed a period of hope, while waiting to see what happens as the months pass.

The other gardening chore for early spring is pruning. Trees don’t have many ways of communication, but they “know” that sharp loppers shearing off branches early in the year means that it’s time to send out buds and shoots. Roses too, lie dormant in the winter and need the snip-snip of a gardener to wake them up. “Wake up,” I tell them, as I trim off last year’s growth. Inside the house, I peer out the window at the bare canes and think of the months of fragrant blooms lying under that frost-touched bark. When the weather warms, they’ll send out furled leaves, reddish then green, and buds will soon follow. As an inexperienced gardener, I didn’t trim the roses. It felt wrong, cruel somehow to cut back a perfectly healthy plant. The roses still bloomed, still grew, but the leaves didn’t get as large, and the flowers weren’t as numerous. I’ve learned my lesson now. My shears are sharp and ready.

Sometimes nature takes its course without our help, and sometimes it needs our assistance. Friendships are like that too. When I was at the store, I purchased a handful of postcards. Who buys these things, except tourists? Who sends postcards, except people who want to brag about how far they’ve gone on vacation? Well, I do. I got out my old address book and started writing down names of friends I hadn’t talked to in a while. It seems so hard to call people out of the blue. I’m always afraid of what they’ll think. She’ll think I need to borrow money, he’ll think I just broke up and am trying to flirt, my cousin will think I want a favor. So I write instead. No one, it seems, minds a postcard.

I’ve learned that I don’t have to write much. “Thinking of you,” seems to cover it. Or maybe, “I saw this postcard with a beagle on it, and remembered your old dog Spot. How are you and Spot doing?” People don’t often write back. Sometimes you have to send them four or five cards before they write you, sometimes they don’t write back at all. Sometimes they’ve moved, and don’t get the postcard. And sometimes, sometimes they’ve missed you too, and wondered why you’ve drifted apart. Sometimes they get out their address book, and pick up the phone, and call to ask you out to coffee. A rectangle of cardstock and a twenty-three cent stamp, and you automatically get a week of hope that you’re about to rekindle an old friendship. And even if that old co-worker doesn’t remember you, or if he’s moved and the postcard arrives at the house of a stranger, you’ve probably brightened someone’s day. That’s worth fifty cents.

Every day we pass people whose names we never learn. That pierced, pink-haired barista that you buy your latte from might have gone to your high school. That old woman who sits on the same spot in the bus might have important lessons to teach you about life. Your study-partner in that night class might be looking for someone to share his theater tickets with. Sure, they’re just strangers, people we don’t know, and don’t need to know. On the other hand, if you see the same person every day, or every week, how do you know that person isn’t meant to be in your life? It’s hard to be outgoing, hard to strike up conversations without an introduction or the comforting venue of a cocktail party. Seeds don’t need much to grow, a bit of warmth, a bit of rain, and nature takes its course. The wind changes, and flocks of birds know it’s time to return home. Maybe all it takes to turn “that girl from the coffee shop” into “Tina, who plays tennis with me on Mondays” is an extra smile, an extra nod, an extra moment of attention. We are each other’s sun, we are each other’s rain. We have the power to turn the barren soil of strangerhood into a small connection between fellow human beings. You don’t have to do it all, in fact, you can’t make a relationship develop by force any more than you can make a turnip grow faster by tugging at its root, but you do have to make an effort. Plant a small seed of possibility.

I’ve got a small stack of postcards on my desk, each one addressed and stamped and ready for the mailman. It took an hour, and half a booklet of stamps. I wrote just a sentence, or just a smiley face and my name. I’m already imagining how fun it would be to throw a party and invite people I haven’t seen for years. On my kitchen windowsill, tomato seeds wait in their peat pots. In my mind the tomatoes (which haven’t yet sprouted) taste like sunlight, miles better than any of the icy slices the guy at the deli puts on my sandwich. At lunch, I smile at the deli guy anyway, and comment on his funny button, and call him “Eddie,” from his nametag. He recognizes me when I come in now, and even though he calls me “No Peppers, Right?” it’s a start. A lottery ticket, unscratched, is stuck to my fridge with a magnet. It could win me ten thousand dollars–or maybe not. It’s fun to wonder, and hope. I’ve got my novel in the hands of an editor too. As February turns into March, and March turns into April, she’ll work her way down the stack to mine. She’ll read it, and she’ll send me a yes, or a no. I’m in no rush to get my SASE back with the answer. For now, I’ll just savor the possibility of what might happen. Few things in this world taste as sweet as hope.

Have A Super Fabulous Thursday, dear friends!

Thursday, Thirsty Thursday Images, Pictures, Comments
Good day, dear ones! I hope everyone is having a fantastic day. I woke up this morning in foggy London, lol! I wish but not really. I am still in Kentucky but I have never seen such fog in my life. It is after lunchtime and it is still foggy. This is strange, strange weather we have been having. I listened to the News though and I believe everyone is having strange weather this year. Days like today make you look at the calendar and count the days to Spring. I know Kiki and I can’t wait for Spring to get here. We miss taking our walks down to the pond. Kiki might be a little Pom but if I don’t keep my eye on her, she jumps in the pond. Oh, brother! 

One Summer, I got a fishing hair up my rump. There is a huge shade tree by the pond and I figured that would be a perfect spot for Kiki and I to fish. I gathered up all my fishing gear and off we went. You can sit at this pond and catch Blue-Gill after Blue-Gill. That year, none of them were big enough to keep. But this year, they might be a good eating size. Anyway back to the story, I would pull in a fish and Kiki would get all excited. She would pounce on the poor fish, growl at it, snarl and just act down right vicious, lol! I didn’t think anything about it. I threw my line back in and got a bite. This was a good bite. So I jerked my pole and the next thing I knew, Kiki was in the pond after my line. I like to, well you know. She was in the pond swimming out to the line. I dropped the rod and started hollering and going in after her. She turned around and starting swimming back, chasing my line. I grabbed the rod before the fish drug it in the pond. I fish with two hooks on my line. On the first line, I had a medium size catfish. I pulled it up on the bank. Kiki came flying out of the pond and stepped on the second hook. I like to have died. She holler and yelped and was wild as a jacka**. I threw the fish back in the pond and I tried to calm Kiki down were I could cut the fishing line. She wouldn’t hold still to save me. So I was smoking, I decided to burn the line off the rod. It worked. I took off running from the pond to the house to get the hook out of her paw. We got to the house, she was almost hysterical. Hubby heard her screaming, he came running. Well I caught heck from him because she had a hook in her paw. Kiki is his baby! I thought I was going to have to slap him, he was almost hysterical too. He sat down in the kitchen and I got the pliers and started to cut the pointy end off the hook. Thank the Goddess, it was just barely through her padded paw. I had no problem getting it out. When it was finally out, hubby and Kiki loved and loved. He kept telling her, I was a bad Momma because I caused her to get a hook in her paw. Yeah, right! I can ask her now, if she wants to go fishing and she jumps up and down. I really don’t think the experience traumatized her too much, lol!

Have a great day and dream of the warm days of Spring that are just a month and 21 days away!

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

 

Today’s Affirmation for Thursday, January 26th

“I am committed to finding the most worthwhile routes for my energies – I will work to transform my emotions into the exhilarating energies of the spirit.”

 

Today’s Visualization for Thursday, January 26th

Releasing Negativity

Close your eyes and focus your attention on the breath. As you in hale visualize yourself drawing pure white light in through your nostrils until it fills your being. As you exhale visualize all your negative thoughts and painful emotions passing out of your nostrils in a muddy stream. Maintain this visualization as you continue breathing.