Turn Up The Heat

Turn Up The Heat

If you feel your romance or relationship has lost the fire/passion that it use to have. Then this spell is for you.

Items You Will Need:

  • A fireplace, balefire pit, barbecue grill, hibachi or other place where you can light a fire safely
  • Matches
  • A piece of paper
  • A pen that writes red ink
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Mustard Seeds
  • Ginger
  • Jasmine
  • Rosemary
  • Bay Leaves

Best Time To Cast:

During the Waxing Moon, preferably on a Tuesday

The Spell:

Collect the ingredients needed for this spell. Cast a circle around the area where you will do your spell. Build a small fire.

On the paper, write what you find enticing about your partner and what you desire from him/her. Be as descriptive and explicit as you like – no one but you will read what you’ve written. When you’ve finished, draw the Runes Gebo, which looks like an X and Teiwaz, which looks like an arrow pointing up, around the edges of the paper. These two symbols represent love and passion respectively.

Place the spices on the paper and fold it to make a packet that contains them. Visualize you and your love in a passionate embrace. As  you hold this image in your mind, toss the packet of spices into the fire. As it burns, your intention is released into the universe. Open the circle.

4 Barbecue Safety Tips from the USDA

4 Barbecue Safety Tips from the USDA

by Katie Waldeck

Independence Day is just around the corner. And, if you’re like millions of  Americans, you’ll spend your day grilling up some tasty foods with friends and  family. It’s certainly a fun time, but it’s also important to recognize the  possible dangers that exist in outdoor barbecues. Indeed, food safety is even  more important in the summer, when hot temperatures foster an ideal environment  for bacteria to grow at a faster rate.

Luckily, the United State Department of Agriculture (USDA) has you covered,  with their helpful guide to preventing foodborne illnesses this 4th of July  holiday. Click through to check out their 4 basic tips for safer  grilling. For even more information on food safety, you can download the  USDA’s Ask Karen mobile phone app or check out the web version. You can also call the USDA hotline at  1-888-MPHotline.

1. Keep It Clean

Just because you’re cooking outdoors doesn’t mean you have to forgo the  cleaning you would do inside the house. If you don’t have access to clean water  during your barbecue, you can either bring some with you or use moist towelettes  and clean cloths to keep surfaces and utensils clean. Keep your hands clean  with hand sanitizer.

2. Keep Everything Separate

Have plenty of clean plates, utensils and platters on hand. Don’t ever reuse  platters or cutting boards that have been exposed to raw meat and poultry — if  there’s harmful bacteria present, it can contaminate even safely-cooked  food.

3. Make Sure Food is Cooked  Thoroughly

Meat and poultry can look perfectly done and safe to eat from the outside,  when, internally, that’s not the case.  Use a food thermometer to make  sure your food is cooked to a safe temperature. The USDA suggests the following internal temperatures:

  • Whole poultry: 165 °F
  • Poultry breasts: 165 °F
  • Ground poultry: 165 °F
  • Ground meats: 160 °F
  • Beef, pork, lamb, and veal (steaks, roasts and chops): 145 °F and allow to  rest at least 3 minutes.

You’ll also want to make sure that your hot food stays hot. Someone not ready  for that burger? Well, you can keep it hot by placing them on the side of the  grill and away from the coals.

4. Keep Food Chilled

Packing food into a cooler is the last thing you should do before leaving  your home for a barbecue. Have a thermometer in your cooler, and make sure  the temperature is always below 40°F. If you can, try to use one cooler for food  and one cooler for drinks. That way, you’ll be able to open up your drink cooler  as often as you like without exposing the food to warmer temperatures.

If it’s hot outside, make sure to keep your food in the cooler. Keep your  food out of the cooler for an hour at most. If you’re not sure how long a food  item has been sitting out in the sun, don’t take the risk. As the USDA says,  “when in doubt, throw it out!”