The Baneful Herbs

The Baneful Herbs

Belladonna = Also known as deadly nightshade, Belladonna is a source of the poisonous drug atropine. In minute quantities, atropine, in the form of a sulfate, is used to dilate the pupils of the eye, to relieve pain, to diminish secretions, and to relieve spasms. In greater quantities, it was used to kill. Belladonna was believed to have been used in flying potions.

Cinquefoil = In folklore, cinquefoil was used in flying potions. Found in many old recipes & Grimores.

Deadly Nightshade = Deadly nightshade was ingested by those who wished to foresee the future.

Foxglove = Many of the common names of this plant pertain to its toxic nature (Witches’ glove, Dead Man’s Bells, Bloody Fingers). Foxglove belongs to the Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae) and the whole plant is toxic. It contains various cardiac glycosides. Foxglove also went by the names Goblin’s Gloves (in Wales), Throttle-wort, Thimble Flower, Finger Flower, Ireland it was also known as Fairy Cap, Lunsmore, and the Great Herb. Foxglove was also considered dear to faeries. If a plant was harmed, the faeries would bring retribution.

Hemlock= Hemlock is an extremely poisonous cousin of parsley. The juice from hemlock’s tiny white flowers was believed to be used to make men impotent. “The plant was an ingredient in many Witches’ Ointments…. According to German folk tradition, the hemlock was home to a toad, which lived beneath it and sucked up its poisons.

Hemp = Hemp was used in many old spells and Incense. I do not consider this plant poisonous, and believe it is quite a magical plant when the female flowers are smoked. Mother earth gave us this plant for a reason. Not to mention what we could do with the fibers and just about every other part of this plant. We could feed and cloth the world.(end rant).

Mandrake = Another plant with a narcotic effect, mandrake or the mandragore (Mandragora officinarum L.) was thought to be a potentially lethal herb to harvest from the earth. For this reason, great caution was used in gathering these magical roots. Many people believed that the mandrake shrieked when harvested and that anyone hearing the piercing cry would die. The root of the mandrake resembles a phallus or a human torso, and for this reason was believed to have occult powers. In some areas of Europe, possession of the root was punishable by death. The crushed root was purported to have caused hallucinations followed by a death-like trance and sleep. The root was also said to have caused insanity and was believed to have been used in flying potions Mandrake root makes a powerful addition to any “Binding spell” and works as a great “Witches” protector.

An List of Some Poisonous Plants

Some spells & concoctions were writtern with out modern facts we have learned a great deal over the years. Though many of the old ways are superior to some new science. This list should be a help to you to discover how to protect yourself from some mistakes. This is not a complete list but a good start. I will add to it as the info comes my way. BEWARE! Aconite Ilex

Apple (balsam) Impaatiens Pallida
Apple (bitter) Indian Arrowroot
Baneberry Inbberry
Bittersweet Jack-In-The-Pupit (root)
Black Nightshade Jurusalem Cherry
Bloodroot Jimson Wood
Blueflag Labumum (seeds)
Burning Bush Laurel (seeds)
Bryony Mandrake
Black Brynoy May Apple (roots, Leaves, seeds)
Europeon White Brynoy Mistetoe (seeds)
Calabar Bean Oak
Calotropis Poinsetta
Cherry Laurel Poison Dogwood
Camphor Poke Root
Castor Oil Plant (seeds only) Rosebay
Cowbane Sumac
Daffodils Springle Tree (seeds)
Deadly Nightshade Spurge
Dog’s Mercury Swollow Wort
Elf Wood Thorn Apple
Ergot Tobacca (concentrated tobacca is
Flag Lily Poison when Eaten!)
Foxglove Wahoo
Gelsemium Wake – Robin
Hemlock Water Drop Wort
Hellebore White Hemlock
Henbane White Rose
Holly (seeds) Wood Anermone (seeds)
Honeysuckle (vines & fruit) Yellow Jasmine
Horse Balm Yew (seeds & berries)
Perwinkle
 
STAY AWAY FROM THE FOLLOWING HERBS!!!!!
Boldo Leaf Sassafras
Calamus Savin
Yellow Comphor Southernwood
Mug Wort Transy
Pennyroyal Wintergreen
Rue Wormwood
Wormseed

Herb of the Day for April 29 is Cocculus, Indicus *POISON*

Herb of the Day

 

Cocculus, Indicus

POISON!

Botanical: Anamirta paniculata (COLEBR.)
Family: N.O. Menispermaceae

—Synonyms—Levant Nut. Fish Berry.
—Part Used—Dried fruit.
—Habitat—India, Ceylon, Malabar.

 


 

—Description—A poisonous climbing plant with ash-coloured corky bark, leaves stalked, heart-shaped, smooth, underside pale with tufts of hair at the junctions of the nerves and at the base of the leaves, the flowers are pendulous panicles, male and female blooms on different plants; fruit round and kidney shaped, outer coat thin, dry, browny, black and wrinkled, inside a hard white shell divided into two containing a whitish seed, crescent shaped and very oily.

—Constituents—The chief constituent is the bitter, crystalline, poisonous substance, picrotoxin; the seed also contains about 50 per cent. of fat.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—The powdered berries are sometimes used as an ointment for destroying lice; the entire fruits are used to stupefy fish, being thrown on the water for that purpose. Picrotoxin is a powerful convulsive poison used principally to check night sweats in phthisis by its action in accelerating respiration, but it is not always successful. It was at one time used to adulterate beers, increasing their reputation as intoxicants; it is an antidote in Morphine poisoning.

—Preparations—Fluid extract, 1/4 to 1 drop. Picrotoxin, B.P.