Life As The Witch – Life Is Messy: Clean It Up

Celtic Comments & Graphics

Life Is Messy: Clean It Up

Once in a while, after you have cast a spell or curse psychic residue might linger and on occasion actually get on you.  While the symptoms vary from person to person, it’s usually the blah’s that hit first. Sometimes there’s nothing more than that, but occasionally other aggravations will come to call. Common side effects include minor bouts of depression, a sudden inability to concentrate, or a state of complete and utter non-productiveness. And if you begin to experience any of those, the only solution is to get that junk off of you immediately. If you don’t, I can nearly guarantee time spent in bed nursing a cold, the flu or worse.

Fortunately, the remedy is painless, tasteless, pleasurable, and inexpensive. It involves nothing more than taking a bath. And since you probably already take a shower or bath at least once every day, nothing could be easier.

Granted, this isn’t exactly your normal sort of bath, as you’ll need to be clean before you jump in. It’s also going to be necessary to completely immerse yourself in the water several times, hair and all. And because your skin and hair must be allowed to dry naturally, you won’t be able to towel off. When compared to the possibility of having to ingest some foul-tasting medicinal concoction though, that’s a pretty small price to pay–especially considering how much better you’re going to feel.

There are several different types of baths that will handle the problem quickly and efficiently and I have posted those baths to follow. Each works equally well, so just choose the one that most appeals to you and call it good. You’ll be glad you did.

Excerpts from:

Utterly Wicked, Curses, Hexes & Other Unsavory Notions
By Dorothy Morrison

Do ‘bath salts’ drive people crazy?

The unregulated ‘bath salts’ from overseas can cause the brain’s danger instinct to kick into overdrive, making the user see everything as a threat.

By Natalie Wolchover, Life’s Little Mysteries
On May 26 in Miami, a naked, “zombielike” man viciously attacked a homeless man, biting off and eating much of his face. Police shot and killed the 31-year-old attacker, Rudy Eugene, who, according to some news outlets, may have been high on “bath salts” at the time of his cannibalistic attack.

These soothing-sounding substances are not what they seem. Manufactured in China and sold legally online and in drug paraphernalia stores under misleading brand names like “Ivory Wave,” bath salts contain a bevy of newly concocted chemicals, such as methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), which aren’t yet banned by the federal government. When snorted, injected or smoked, the synthetic powders can induce a state of paranoid delirium paired with abnormal strength, a combination that often leads to horrific acts of violence.   Read More Here ……