Seasons of the Witch for May 12th

Seasons of the Witch ( Some ancient and some not so much!)
 
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Account Days begin (until 30th)
Buddha`s Birthday – South Korea
Celtic tree month of Saille ends
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Day – Australia
Fatigue Syndrome Day
Festival of Sashti – India
Fibromyalgia Awareness Day
Garland Day
Garland Day – Dorsetshire, UK
Garland Day (aka Derby Day) – UK
International Midwives Day – Australia
International Migratory Bird Day
International Nurses Day
Kite Day
Lord Buddha’s Birthday – Hong Kong
Mangers pour divers loas – Haiti
Mangers pour divers loas – Voudon
National Hospital Day
National Limerick Day
National Mushroom Festival
National Nutty Fudge Day
National Windmill Day
National Wine Show
Native American Rights Day
Nonsense Day
Nurse’s Day – Australia
Pentecost Monday
Pfingstmontag (Pentecost Monday) – Switzerland
Pisark Bochea – Cambodia
Pisark Bochea – Cambodia
St. Andrew’s Day – Georgia
St. Epiphanius’ Day
St. Epiphanius’ Day
St. Francis Patrizi’s Day (patron of reconcilliations)
St. Nereus and Achilleus’ Day
St. Pancras’ Day (2nd Ice Saint; patron of children, oaths, treaties)
St. Tammany’s Day (patron of democracy)
Whitmonday
Woodmen Ranger’s Day
 
Belgium: The Cat Parade is celebrated in honor of felines.
India: Celebration of Aranya Sashti, a god of the woodlands similar to Pan.
Voudun: “Mangers” pour divers loas
1978 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that they would no longer exclusively name hurricanes after women.
 
 

NOTE:   Because of the large number of ancient calendars, many in simultaneous use, as well as different ways of computing holy days (marked by the annual inundation, the solar year, the lunar month, the rising of key stars, and other celestial and terrestial events), you may find these holy days celebrated a few days earlier or later at your local temple.  

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Remember the ancient ways and keep them sacred! 
GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives

Mild Energy Tonic for Fatigue

This is an excellent tonic for travelers or those recuperating from chronic illness or surgery.

1   tablespoon Siberian ginseng root

1   tablespoon ho shou wu (foti)

1   codonopsis dang shen root

2   slices (or 2 tablespoons ground root) astragalus yellow vetch

1   tablespoon suma root (optional)

Simmer all in 2 cups of water, covered, for 1 1/2 hours, or tincture in brandy to cover for 1 month. Drink 1/2 cup of tea daily or dilute a teaspoon of tincture in boiled water. It is safe for elderly folks and children in half doses. For elderly folks, drink 1/4 cup of tea twice daily. Children over 10 years old may drink 1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon of diluted tea daily for 1 to 2 weeks of the month. If suma and Siberian ginseng are not available as roots, use a tablespoon of dried herbs or buy a tincture (an alcoholic tincture of these roots is often available in health food stores) and add a few drops to your tea.