Tanning Trumps Skin Cancer Fears for Young Adults

by Ann Pietrangelo

Young adults would rather indulge in tanning today than worry about skin  cancer tomorrow. Tanning is the norm in some circles. It’s expected. Skin cancer  is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the most  deadly type of skin cancer, but that’s not scaring young adults from the lure of  the tanning booth.

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and from indoor tanning  equipment increase the risk of developing skin cancer. Engaging in indoor  tanning before age 35 increases the risk of melanoma by 75 percent. Recent  studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National  Cancer Institute found that:

  • Indoor tanning is common among young adults, with the highest rates of  indoor tanning among white women aged 18-21 years (32 percent) and 22-25 years  (30 percent). The reports evaluated data from the National Health Interview  Survey’s Cancer Control Supplement.
  • The highest prevalence of indoor tanning was reported among white women aged  18-21 years residing in the Midwest (44 percent), and those aged 22-25 years in  the South (36 percent).
  • Among white women aged 18-21 years who reported indoor tanning, an average  of 28 visits occurred in the past year.
  • Among white adults who reported indoor tanning, 58 percent of women and 40  percent of men used one 10 or more times in the previous year.
  • Fifty percent of people aged 18-29 reported at least one sunburn in the  previous year despite taking protective measures.

“More public health efforts, including providing shade and  sunscreen in recreational settings, are needed to raise awareness of the  importance of sun protection and sunburn prevention to reduce the burden of skin  cancer,” said Marcus Plescia, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Cancer  Prevention and Control. “We must accelerate our efforts to educate young adults  about the dangers of indoor tanning to prevent melanoma as this generation  ages.”

The reports were published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly  Report.

On a personal note, I’m not a “tanner” and I’ve not had skin cancer, but I have  had cancer. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. It’s certainly not a good trade  for tan skin — or red skin — or orange skin. It is an avoidable risk and one not worth  taking. Oh, and if you’re concerned about your appearance, it is worth noting  that over time, tanning gives your skin that nice wrinkled, leathery look…

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

E. Coli O145 Ban Opposed by Meat Industry

by Dr. Michael Greger

 

One child is dead and 13 others sickened across six states in an ongoing  outbreak of E. coli O145. Another child—a first-grader in  Massachusetts—also died recently, but that was due to a different strain of  E. coli, O157. After the Jack-in-the-Box outbreak in 1993, E.  coli O157 was declared an adulterant, meaning it became illegal to sell  meat testing positive for the deadly pathogen. It still, however, remained  perfectly legal to sell meat contaminated with the other “Big Six”  toxin-producing E. coli strains: O26, O111, O103, O121, O45 and O145.  These strains are collectively sickening twice as many Americans as O157. For years, food safety and  consumer organizations have fought to ban the sale of meat soiled with these  other deadly strains against meat industry objections.

In the 1990s, the American Meat Institute opposed the original ban on the  sale of raw meat contaminated with E. coli O157 despite the devastating  effect this pathogen could have on vulnerable populations, especially children.  Here’s how one mother described what E. coli O157:H7 did to her  three-year-old daughter Brianna:

“The pain during the first 80 hours was horrific,  with intense abdominal cramping every 10 to 12 minutes. Her intestines swelled  to three times their normal size and she was placed on a ventilator. Emergency  surgery became essential and her colon was removed. After further surgery,  doctors decided to leave the incision open, from sternum to pubis, to allow  Brianna’s swollen organs room to expand and prevent them from ripping her skin.  Her heart was so swollen it was like a sponge and bled from every pore. Her  liver and pancreas shut down and she was gripped by thousands of convulsions,  which caused blood clots in her eyes. We were told she was brain dead.”

The ban passed in 1994 despite meat industry opposition, and now the number  of Americans dying from E. coli O157 is half of what it used to be.  Unfortunately this lesson was lost on the American Meat Institute, which  continued to fight tooth and nail against similar regulations targeting the  other Big Six strains. This week they lost. Meat known to test positive for any of these  potentially deadly fecal pathogens can no longer be legally sold as of June 4,  2012. Too late for Maelan Elizabeth Graffagnini, though—the 21-month old victim  of E. coli O145 whose funeral was held the same day.

The immediate source of the current outbreak has yet to be identified, but  the original source is always the same: feces. How contaminated is the American  meat supply with fecal matter?

What about the hundreds of thousands of Americans that die from  non-intestinal E. coli infections? Please feel free to check  out my 3-min. video Chicken Out of UTIs.

The meat industry argues that they should be allowed to sell unsafe meat  because it only poses a risk if it’s not properly cooked or handled. Ironically,  they’re also opposed to safe handling labeling. See my 3-min. video Food  Poisoning Bacteria Cross-Contamination.

In health, Michael Greger, M.D.