Mythology of the Moon

Mythology of the Moon

 

In legend, the Moon was seen as the home of the Goddess or as the Goddess Herself and like the Sun was among the first things to be created.

The Creation Of The Moon

The Navajo legend tells of the creation of the Sun and Moon. The first people emerged from the Underworld to live on the surface of the Earth. But the Earth was dark and cold and so First Man and First Woman fashioned two disks from glowing crystal quartz to form the Sun and Moon so that there would be light by both day and night.

First the Sun disk was adorned with a mask of blue turquoise with red coral around its edge and it offered warmth as well as light. First Man and First Woman next attached eagle and lark feathers to the Sun so that its light and heat would be cast to all four corners of the Earth. The Sun disk was fixed in the Eastern sky with lightning darts. First Man and First Woman paused to admire the great beauty they had created for the day and then turned to the night.

The moon disk was decorated with clear shimmering crystal and pearl white shells, and like the Sun was fixed high in the sky. But to the sorrow of the first people, their creations were static and lifeless.

Two wise old men offered their spirits to the disks that they might live and move forever. First Man and First Woman then marked out the daily path of the Sun by fixing twelve eagle feathers at equal points. At dawn, the Sun began to move across the sky, warming and illuminating all in the blackness beneath. At dusk, the Sun returned tired from his journey, and the Moon, also adorned with eagle feathers began his course.

However, Wind Boy, who thought it unfair that the Moon should have to travel so far by night alone, blew his strong breezes so that the moon might glide effortlessly across the darkened heavens. However, the moon’s eagle feathers blew across his face, temporarily blinding him and so to this day the moon follows an irregular passage across the night sky.